Tahoe City Lake Forest Campground

Lake Forest Campground is located one and a half miles east of Tahoe City, off Highway 28 on Lake Forest Road. Lake Forest Campground consist of 20 sites that are available on a first come, first serve basis. The sites themselves are set along a looping road that lacks a thick forest setting, but makes up for it with thick bushes and grass which creates a nice privacy barrier at most sites. Many consider Lake Forest Campground as more of an overflow area when no other campsites in the area are available. The location makes it a nice North Lake Tahoe campsite with it’s close proximity to Tahoe City, the Truckee River and Kings Beach. For boaters you can launch your boat at the Lake Forest Public Boat Ramp in the same location as the campground. The campground is run by Tahoe City Public Utility District.

Directions: Lake Forest Campground is located one and a half miles east of Tahoe City, off Highway 28 on Lake Forest Road.

Read More

Meeks Bay Campground

Meeks Bay Campground is situated between two popular California State Parks, adjacent to the beautiful Lake Tahoe. The crystal clear waters and sandy beaches, just steps away from the campground, provide a recreational escape for outdoor enthusiasts.

Natural Features: Meeks Bay is in the Lake Tahoe Basin, located on the west shore of Lake Tahoe at a 6,225-foot elevation.

Recreation: The 22-mile-long Lake Tahoe provides sunbathing, swimming, boating and water skiing. Anglers can look forward to healthy fish populations of kokanee salmon and mackinaw, rainbow and brown trout.

Facilities: The campground offers multiple single-family campsites for tent and RV camping. Some sites offer sweeping views of the lake. All sites are close together, some even sharing parking spurs, offering limited privacy between sites.

Directions: Meeks Bay Campground is located 10 miles south of Tahoe City, on California Highway 89.

Read More

D.L. Bliss State Park

About the Park: Campers and day use visitors enjoy swimming or scuba diving in the crystal clear water of Lake Tahoe, picnicking, relaxing on the warm sand of Lester Beach or Calawee Cove, and hiking the Rubicon Trail, Lighthouse Trail, and Balancing Rock Trail. Lester Beach is a popular location to launch your kayak, paddleboard, or canoe, but keep in mind that trailers are not allowed in the day use parking lots.

The grandeur of the parks and their setting is a product of successive upheavals of the mountain-building processes that raised the Sierra Nevada. From promontories such as Rubicon Point in D.L. Bliss State Park you can see over one hundred feet into the depths of Lake Tahoe.

The park is named for a pioneering lumberman, railroad owner, and banker of the region. The D.L. Bliss family donated 744 acres to the State Park system in 1929.

Directions: The park is located 17 miles south of Tahoe City on Highway 89, a couple of miles north of Emerald Bay.

More information: www.parks.ca.gov

Read More

Tahoe Rim Trail & Pacific Crest Trail

1. Ward Canyon to Paige Meadows
Classification : Easy
Distance : 1.4 miles round trip
Low / High Elevations : 6520 ft. / 6840 ft
Highlights : Paige Meadows area with great wildflowers and terrific fall colors.
Location : Ward Creek Boulevard Trailhead. This trailhead can be found off Highway 89, 2.5 miles south of Tahoe City. Turn (right if coming from the north and left if coming from the south) onto Ward Creek Boulevard. Go 2.5 miles till you see a small TRT kiosk.
Best accessed from : West and North Shore of Lake Tahoe and Truckee.
Users : This section is open to hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrians.
Description : The trail heads east for 0.2 miles, then joins a northwest climbing dirt road. For the next 0.5 miles, you will follow this road steeply uphill through a thick forest of white fir and Jeffrey pine. Near the top of the hill there is a break in the trees, allowing for views of Ward Canyon, Ward Peak, and the Sherwood Chairlift of Alpine Meadows. AT the next dirt road be sure to turn left and stay on the TRT. Paige Meadows is actually a series of five interconnected meadows, which provide spring wildflowers, colorfull drifts of aspen leaves in the fall, and great mountain views all year long. Make sure to remain on the trail as meadows are very fragile ecosystems! After enjoying your meadow experience, turn around and return to your car.

2. Barker North to Vista Point
Classification : Medium
Distance : 3.5 miles round trip 
Low / High Elevations : 7650 ft / 7970 ft
Highlights : Amazing views of Lake Tahoe and the Desolation Wilderness, open fields full of mule's ears and other wild flowers, and a nice creek area.
Location : To reach the Barker Pass trailhead, take Hwy 89 4 miles south from Tahoe City or 4 miles north from Tahoma, then turn (right if coming from the north and left if coming from the south) onto Blackwood Canyon Road at Kaspian Campground. The trailhead is 7.5 miles from the turnoff.
Best accessed from : West and North Shore of Lake Tahoe & Truckee. 
Users : This trail is open to hikers and equestrians. This part of the TRT is also the Pacific Crest Trail, and due to PCT regulations mountain bikes are not allowed.
Description : For the first mile, a moderately steep walk heads west around the south side of Barker Peak, through open fields of mule's ears and past eastward views down Blackwood Canyon to Lake Tahoe. After another 0.25 miles, you will cross a beautiful stream bordered with asters, delphiniums, tiger lilies, columbines, paintbrushes, and other wildflowers. A0.5 miles gentle trek up through open volcanic terrain and  red fir forest leads to two lofty volcanic plugs which provide excellent wind protection for a picnic and sightseeing. The TRT continues from here, but if you go further make sure to give yourself enough time to get back to your car before the sun sets.

3. Echo Lake to Lake Aloha
Classification : Hard
Distance : 12 miles round trip
Low / High Elevations : 7525 ft / 8540 ft
Highlights : A true wilderness experience, with pristine lakes and spectacular mountains scenery.
Location : On US Highway 50, follow signed turnoff to Echo Lake 0.5 mile west of Echo Summit. Look for a parking lot about a mile from the turnoff, near Lower Echo Lake. The trail starts at the dam below Echo Chalet.
Best accessed from : West and south sides of Lake Tahoe, Meyers, Kirkwood, Markleeville, and Placerville.
Users : This trail is open to hikers and equestrians. Because it is a wilderness trail and as such mountain bikers are not allowed.
Description : From the dam at Lower Echo Lake, the trail follows the shoreline past gnarled trees and some quaint cabin homes. It then curves south over the rocky peninsula between Lower and Upper Echo Lakes, and arrives at a trail junction. Going down to the left will take you to the Echo Lake Taxi Pier, where a water taxi goes back to the chalet. (For information contact Echo Chalet at 530-659-7207). The TRT continues straight and climbs steadily over more rocky terrain. After another 0.6 miles, the trail levels off as you enter Desolation Wilderness. In the next 2.9 miles you will many trails, so be careful not to stray off the TRT/PCT. During this time you will be climbing steadily through open granite areas, several mixed forests of red firs, mountain hemlocks and western white pine and scattered small grassy meadows that bloom with wildflowers. Finally after 6 miles of fairly steady uphill you will arrive at Lake Aloha. This is the ideal spot to relax, have lunch, swim, and soak in a the sun before returning to your car.

Special Note: There are many incredible lakes and back country options in Desolation Wilderness. If you would like more information on the range of possibilities in this area please contact the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit at 530-543-2600.
Permit Required : This hike takes you into Desolation Wilderness where a permit is required.

Read More

Ellis Peak Trail

Distance: 5 Miles (out and back)

Details: Ellis Peak Trail is a 5 mile out and back trail located near Homewood, California that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking & mountain biking and is accessible from June until October.

Trailhead: Head south on #89 from Tahoe City for another 4.2 miles to Caspian Picnic Area. Turn west on Blackwood Canyon Road. The road follows Blackwood creek for 2.3 miles, crosses the creek and then climbs 4.8 miles to Barker Pass. Ellis Peak Trailhead is located on the south side of the road where the pavement ends on the summit.

Read More

Eagle Falls Trail

Distance: varying

Details: From Tahoe City take Hwy 89 south 25 miles to Emerald Bay, to the Eagle Falls Picnic Area is on the right. This is a popular and congested area. A Wilderness permit is required. This steep trail leads into the heart of Desolation Wilderness. Eagle Lake is a popular short hike. Longer hikes include the three Velmas, Dicks and Fontanillis lakes. Trails: 4.5 miles to Dicks and Upper & Middle Velmas, 5 miles to Fontanillis.

Read More

Bayview Trail

Distance: varying

Details: From Tahoe City take Hwy 89 south 25 miles, go around Emerald Bay to the Bayview Campground across from Inspiration Point. Parking is located at the far end of the campground. View Emerald Bay and Lake Tahoe along this steep trail that leads you up the side of Maggie’s Peal into Desolation Wilderness. Sights include Granite Lake. Corral and watering facilities for horses are available at the trailhead. A Wilderness permit is required. Trails: 1 mile to Granite, 4 miles to Azure, 5 miles to Dicks.

Read More

Meeks bay Trail

Distance: varying

Details: From Tahoe City take Hwy 89 south 12 miles to the Meeks Bay Resort. Parking is across the highway from the resort at a small dirt parking lot. A Wilderness permit is required. This moderate hike takes you along the northernmost part of the unofficial Tahoe-Yosemite Trail. After following a road for approximately 1.3 miles, the trail passes a small spring, parallels Meeks Creek and continues upward into a forested valley. View Alpine lakes before the trail ascends 1,000 feet up a series of switchbacks leading to Phipps Pass. Trails: 4.5 miles to Genevieve, 5 miles to Craig, 5.7 miles to Hidden, 5.9 to Shadow, 6.3 miles to Stony Ridge, 8 miles to Rubicon.

Read More

Emerald Bay - Vikingsholm Castle

Distance: 1 mile (one-way)

Details: From Tahoe City take Hwy 89 south 25 miles to Emerald Bay, there will be a parking lot on the left. View an authentic replica of a Viking castle. Daily tours from mid-June through Labor Day for a nominal fee. View Emerald Bay and Fannette Island from the shoreline of Emerald Bay State Park. Hike the short trail to Lower Eagle Falls which begins directly across from the castle. No pets allowed.

Read More

Paige Meadows

Distance: varying

Details: Take Hwy 89, two miles south of Tahoe City, turn right on Pineland Drive. Go up the road approximately 2 miles and look right for Forest Service Road 15N60 or 16N48 to get to the area. Page Meadows is located approx. 1 mile up the dirt road. There are no designated trails in the meadow.

Here are a couple of other ways to get to Paige Meadows from either 64 acres via Granlibakken Road or Ward Creek Road vs trying to ride up the gnarly steep, loose, rocky single track trail to the north side of Granlibakken.

From 64 acres the easiest way is to take the TCPUD bike path to Granlibakken Road to Rawhide Road and on up the fire road about 2 + eventually into Paige Meadows.

Another easy, but longer way is to ride up Ward Creek Road all the way to Chamonix to the end and enter through the green gate. Ride the double track north to the single track and head east into the meadows about 1 mile and to the right

Read More

Tahoe City X Country

Tahoe City X Country

Tahoe XC is now operating during the summer months, providing services out of the day lodge. The summer hiking and biking trails are as phenomenal as the winter ski trails  at Tahoe XC. Tahoe Cross Country's day lodge is located on Tahoe City Public Utility District property just east of Burton Creek State Park. From the trailhead at Tahoe XC, hikers and bikers can access incredible views of Lake Tahoe, fun singletrack trails, and beautiful meadows. Find information at the trailhead, and head out and enjoy Burton Creek State Park.

www.tahoexc.org

Read More

TCPUD Multi-Use Bike Trail System

TCPUD Multi-Use Bike Trail System

The Tahoe Trailways Bike Path meanders along the west shore of Lake Tahoe in California. From a hub in Tahoe City's 64-Acres Park, the system branches out with three paved legs, reaching Dollar Point in the northeast, Olympic (Squaw) Valley in the northwest and Sugar Pine Point State Park in the south. The trails link residential, recreation and business areas, offering scenic views of Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River.

Take the paved path south along SR 89 from Tahoe City to reach Sugar Pine Point State Park. Portions of this stretch hug the Lake Tahoe shoreline, offering magnificent views of the glistening water and recreational boat traffic. Just north of Tahoe Pines, the Kaspian Day Use Area allows swimming, so you'll want to bring your bathing suit in the summer.

There are a couple of gaps in the trail immediately north and south of Homewood Mountain Resort, but these can be bridged via on-road routes. At the trail's south end, you'll find yourself in sprawling Sugar Pine Point State Park. The park preserves dense forests of fir, aspen, juniper and pine, while also permitting hiking, swimming, camping and fishing.

Read More

Blackwood Canyon

Blackwood Canyon

4.5mi. Roundtrip, Easy, ½ day
Blackwood canyon is a winter recreation haven. Crosscountry skiers, shoeshoers, and snowmobilers, all enjoy the splendor of the canyon in the winter months. This trek leads you from the Sno-park back into the canyon to where Blackwood Creek crosses the path. Here you’ll find an ideal spot to enjoy a hot cup of coco while watching birds fly by, and viewing animal tracks in the snow.

Read More

Paige Meadows

Paige Meadows

On clear, sunny days of winter, most people in Tahoe will be at a ski resort, or at work. That leaves a lot of open forest land for alternative activities like snowshoeing and cross country skiing.

Up above Lake Tahoe, Paige Meadows provides picturesque winter scenery for dog walks and snowshoeing. Between November and April, the floor of the meadows is snow-covered. For kids, Paige Meadows is a safe place for snowplay and building snowmen. Away from the road, the only noise in Paige Meadows will be the sound of snow crunching beneath your own feet. Get away from the bustle of Tahoe City and enter an environment with sparkling snow and a natural scent of pine.

Read More

Sugar Pine Point State Park

Sugar Pine Point State Park

Ed Z'berg - Sugar Pine Point State Park contains one of the finest remaining natural areas on Lake Tahoe. With nearly two miles of lake frontage, the park has dense forests of pine, fir, aspen and juniper. 

Another attraction is the Hellman-Ehrman Mansion (also known as Pine Lodge), a summer home built in 1903 in a grove of pine and cedar. From the turn of the century until 1965, the lands of what is now Ed Z'berg - Sugar Pine Point State Park were owned by financier Isaias W. Hellman, and later by his daughter Florence Hellman Ehrman. The mansion provides an interesting view into the lifestyles of the wealthy on Lake Tahoe. 

Summer Biking: Take Hwy 89 south along the West Shore from Tahoe City. Sugar Pine Point State Park is on the left side of the road. Parking is limited. Distance: 2 to 15 miles one way. Details: A short loop trail through the Z'Berg Natural Preserve, the Dolder Trail follows the lakeshore and passes the world's highest working lighthouse. For those with more time, the General Creek Trail is a 6 1/2 mile loop, offering an optional side trip to Lily Pond. Lost Lake, a beautiful alpine lake, is a full 15 miles round trip.

Read More

Paige Meadows

Paige Meadows

Start in the large public parking area just south of the Truckee River and follow the Truckee River Bike Path over a bridge and along the north side of the river. This part is easy, beautiful, and suitable for all abilities. It's crowded, so don't go too fast or get too distracted by the bikinis... I mean rafters. When you come to the River Run restaurant and Alpine Meadows, turn left and head towards the ski area. 

Turn left on Snow Crest Road and climb uphill a while. Before descending, look for a dirt road going off to the left. This is 16N48, which you follow steeply uphill for a while. This first part is rocky, loose, and not very nice, but it's over quickly. It then gently climbs up through dense pine forest with glimpse views of the mountains and Lake Tahoe on much smoother, fast dirt. 

After a few miles, you level off and are now in the Paige Meadow area, where there are tons of trails. Feel free to explore - they all reconnect eventually, and this area is the highlight of the ride. To follow this route, pass the first left turn option (which leads to Paige Meadows) and keep a sharp eye out for another left. It has a "no vehicles" sign but no name. Walk your bike across a short boggy section and you'll soon intersect the Tahoe Rim Trail - Truckee River to Ward Creek. 

Turn left and enjoy the spectacular trail through the meadow. Once done, loop around a little more if you like, or if you're ready to return, follow the TRT down a steep singletrack back to the Truckee River, and your car soon after that.

Here are a couple of other ways to get to Paige Meadows from either 64 acres via Granlibakken Road or Ward Creek Road vs trying to ride up the gnarly steep, loose, rocky single track trail to the north side of Granlibakken.

From 64 acres the easiest way is to take the TCPUD bike path to Granlibakken Road to Rawhide Road and on up the fire road about 2 + eventually into Paige Meadows.

Another easy, but longer way is to ride up Ward Creek Road all the way to Chamonix to the end and enter through the green gate. Ride the double track north to the single track and head east into the meadows about 1 mile and to the right.

Read More

Sugar Pine Point State Park

Sugar Pine Point State Park

Ed Z'berg - Sugar Pine Point State Park contains one of the finest remaining natural areas on Lake Tahoe. With nearly two miles of lake frontage, the park has dense forests of pine, fir, aspen and juniper. 

Another attraction is the Hellman-Ehrman Mansion (also known as Pine Lodge), a summer home built in 1903 in a grove of pine and cedar. From the turn of the century until 1965, the lands of what is now Ed Z'berg - Sugar Pine Point State Park were owned by financier Isaias W. Hellman, and later by his daughter Florence Hellman Ehrman. The mansion provides an interesting view into the lifestyles of the wealthy on Lake Tahoe. 

Winter: Winter visitors to the park will find over 20 kilometers of marked cross country ski trails and a heated restroom in the General Creek campground. Interpretive presentations on a variety of winter related subjects are presented most weekends, from January through March.

It was also the site of the 1960 Olympics Nordic events, lots of “firsts” and great nordic skiing trails that are groomed on one of the former Olympic Biathlon Trails, the Red Trail. These trails all start out of the west side or campground side at the Blue trail-head. There is also snowshoeing, hiking and winter camping and an exact 1/4 scale replica of the Tower of Nations from the 8th Winter Games of the 1960 Olympics.

Read More